What A Messed Up World – part 2

What is a “lucky country”? 

Is it lots of land and freedom to live we’re you want? Is it the ability to protest or disagree with the government and not fear reprisals? How about wealth that makes you not want for anything? Religious freedom? You could probably ask thousands of people and you would get a mix of these things plus many more definitions. In fact the idea for a lucky country is so broad that it all boils down to a simple common factor, it’s people. This is what makes a country lucky in my view. Without people all you have is land that no one uses. People shape a country, give it focus and direction. That being said we can easily loose sight of what it means to be in a lucky country. 

My wife recently got back from a missions trip with her school to Cambodia. She was talking about some of the things that could be said and not said which we would normally take for granted. Yet the biggest thing that stood out to me was the resourcefulness of the people there. For a developing country they certainly don’t take anything for granted. Wallets made from recycled tyre rubber, iPad cases using recycled paper and fabric, laminated newspaper wallets and pencil cases, coffee cup wrappers made from upholstery scraps. This might not seem like much but for many it’s the difference between eating that night or going hungry. 

Perhaps it is necessity that creates a lucky country? How many of us would spend 13hrs a day sifting through garbage piles looking for materials to use or sell? After all many of us take what we have in life for granted. We have food, roof over our heads, safe place to sleep, if something we own is broken we toss it out and usually get a new one (seems to include spouses as well if you look at statistics 😁 ). Without a necessity we don’t seem to have a driving force in our lives. Keep in mind I am being very general here so it’s not the same for every individual. 

If you read stories of life during the two world wars, there are loads of examples of people using their ingenuity to help keep things moving with limited resources. Recycling was an everyday thing. Growing your own food made it possible to extend limited rations for many valuable days for those not on the front lines. Those fighting also used creative ideas at times to get by with their own limited resources. 

To me a lucky country is made by its people. Those who take what little they have and find ways to live a full life. People who help their neighbours to thrive. Diversity of cultures and nations that learn together to be a greater country as a whole than a country of singular people.

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